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Ford Expedition 5.4L V8 Engine Oil Change Guide
Pictures illustrated instructions for how to change the motor oil in a 2003-2006 Ford Expedition with the 5.4L V8 engine.

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Please note, I am not a professional mechanic. This guide is for illustrative purposes only. I assume no responsibility for damage to your vehicles, property, persons, or pets. If you have any doubts, do not proceed and consult a professional.
2003 Ford Expedition

5.4 Liter Triton V8 Engine

118,914 Miles


This automotive "how-to" guide was specifically written to assist owners of the 2003 to 2006 Ford Expedtiion SUV equipped with the 5.4L Triton V8 engine in changing the motor oil and filter.

Owners of other Ford vehicles equipped with the 5.4L engine or the 4.6L V8 may also find this guide to be useful. Some of these vehicles include the Ford F-150 truck, and the Lincoln Navigator SUV.

The owner's manual for this 2003 Ford Expedition recommends using 6 quarts of 5W-20 when changing the motor oil and filter in both the 5.4L V8 and the 4.6L V8 engines.

To complete this oil change procedure, you'll need the following tools: a floor jack, jack stands, a 5/8 or 17mm socket, and an automotive funnel.

2 Ton Jack & Jack Stands
Oil Filter - Front of Engine
Oil Filter - Under Engine
For this oil change, I chose a Purolator PureONE PL24651 oil filter for $6.49 from Advance Auto Parts. Other options include the Purolator L24651, Mobil 1 M1-210, K&N HP-2010, Fram PH2, Bosch D3410, and the AC Delco PF1250.
Oil Pan Drain Bolt
Drain Bolt - 5/8 or 17mm
Remove 5/8 Drain Bolt
The first step is to warm up the engine for a few minutes and then jack up one side of the vehicle (the passenger side is best for most vehicles) and support it with a jack stand or two. The 2003-2006 Expedition's jack point is indicated by a small arrow cutout in the metal. The oil filter (white cylinder in the pictures above) can be seen from underneath the engine and through the front bumper area. The oil pan drain bolt is located near the rear of the engine's underside.
Old Oil Draining Out
Replace Drain Bolt
Tighten Drain Bolt
Warming up the engine allows the old oil to flow out more quickly and suspends more of the contaminants that may be in the motor. Removing the oil filler cap from the top of the engine also helps the old oil to drain out faster. To remove the oil pan drain bolt, use a 5/8 socket and ratcheting wrench and turn it counter clockwise. Be sure to position the oil catch container directly below the oil drain bolt. I found that a 17mm socket also seemed to fit the oil drain bolt well if you don't have a 5/8 US socket or wrench.
Twist Off Old Oil Filter
Move Oil Catch Container
Oil Dripping From Filter
After waiting a few minutes for the old oil to drain out, I re-inserted the oil drain bolt and tightened it down by hand with the 5/8 socket to about 1/4 to 1/2 turn clockwise past hand tight. Don't over tighten the oil drain bolt or it may damage the oil pan.
Purolator PL24651 Filter
Old Filter Removed
View From Front of Engine
I found it easiest to access the old oil filter on the Ford 5.4L Triton engine by reaching in behind the front bumper towards the rear of the SUV.  The old oil filter is located closer to the driver side of the vehicle and is mounted horizontally with the round top of the filter facing the front bumper and the threaded open end facing the rear of the Expedition.
Oil Filler Cap & Dipstick
New Quart 5W-20 Oil
Lubricating Rubber O-Ring
To remove the old oil filter, grab it with clean dry hands and twist it in a counter clockwise direction. If it is too difficult to turn the old oil filter, you may need an oil filter wrench. (In a pinch, some people drive a screwdriver into the old oil filter and use that to twist it off. But that is a last resort.) Some oil will leak out of the old filter, so be sure to have the oil catch container or some rags below the front part of the engine.
Oil Filter Receptacle
New Oil Filter In Place
Screw On Clockwise
Prepare the new oil filter by placing a tiny bit of new engine oil on the rubber o-ring with your finger. Lubricating the o-ring on the new filter allows it to create a better seal, prevents oil leaks, and makes it easier to remove it during the next oil change.
Tighten Hand Tight
Oil Filler Cap Removed
Funnel In Oil Filler
Twist on the new oil filter by hand until it is tight and then turn it 1/4 to 1/2 turn past hand tight. Don't use an oil filter wrench to tighten the new oil filter or you may damage it or the oil filter receptacle's threads.
Pouring In New 5W-20
Engine Oil Dipstick
The owner's manual calls for 6 quarts of 5W-20 oil for an oil change with a new filter. So I poured in 5 quarts of oil, ran the engine for a minute, let it sit for a few minutes, and checked the oil level on the dipstick. Then I slowly added in the sixth quart and repeatedly checked the dipstick until the level reached the "Full" line. Then I replaced the oil filler cap and the dipstick. It's a good idea to check the oil level on the dipstick a few times over the next several days and look for any oil leaks on your driveway or garage floor.
Check Oil Level
Add Oil Until At Max Line
For more of my related automotive guides or reviews, click on the following links: Ford Expedition Headlight Bulbs Replacement Guide, Ford Expedition Tail Light Bulbs Replacement Guide, Ford Expedition Overhead Map Light Bulbs Replacement Guide, Meguiar's Headlight Restoration Kit Review, WeatherTech FloorLiner Mats Review, Car Headlight / Tail Light Condensation Repair Guide, Sunforce Solar Battery Maintainer, Corroded Car Battery Terminal Replacement Guide, Garmin Nuvi 260W GPS Review, Car Interior Carpet Replacement Guide, Buffing Old Faded Headlights Guide, K&N Air Filter Cleaning Guide, and Zaino Bros Show Car Polish Review.
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